Focus on keeping your vision clear

Glaucoma is a group of diseases that can cause permanent vision loss and blindness. Some forms of glaucoma don’t have any symptoms, so you may still have glaucoma even if you don’t have any trouble seeing or feel any pain. If you find and get treatment for glaucoma early, you can protect your eyes from serious vision loss.

January is glaucoma awareness month, and it’s the perfect time to check and see if you’re at high risk. You’re at high risk for glaucoma if one or more of these applies to you:

  • You have diabetes.
  • You have a family history of glaucoma.
  • You’re African American and 50 or older.
  • You’re Hispanic and 65 or older.

Medicare will cover a glaucoma test once every 12 months if you’re at high risk. Talk to your doctor or eye doctor for more information about scheduling a test.

To learn more, read about glaucoma, or watch our glaucoma awareness video.

Find cervical cancer early—get screened

Over 12,000 women in the U.S. are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year. Early treatment is key, and fortunately, it’s one of the easiest female cancers to detect.

Medicare covers Pap tests, Human Papillomavirus (HPV) tests (as part of Pap tests), and pelvic exams that can help find cervical and vaginal cancer early and improve recovery and survival rates. Pap tests are covered every 24 months for all women, and every 12 months if you’re at high risk. Medicare covers HPV tests once every 5 years if you’re 30–65 without HPV symptoms.

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month, so it’s the perfect time to get screened. Watch our Cervical Health Awareness Month video, and visit our cervical & vaginal cancer screenings page to learn more about these tests.

Stop the flu before it stops you

Flu season is back, which means it’s time to protect yourself and loved ones by getting a free flu shot.

Flu viruses change from year to year, so it’s important to get a flu shot each flu season. It’s free for people with Medicare, once per flu season when you get it by doctors or other health care providers (like senior centers and pharmacies) that take Medicare.

National Influenza Vaccination Week is December 3–9. Don’t let the flu stop you from enjoying the holidays. Get your free flu shot today!

Wear your red ribbon – Support World AIDS Day

Did you know that 40,000 people are diagnosed with HIV in the U.S. each year? Of the 1.1 million people currently living with HIV in the U.S., 1 in 7 don’t even know they have it. Medicare covers HIV screenings for people with Medicare 15-65 years old who ask for the test, people younger than 15 or older than 65 who are at increased risk, and pregnant women.

HIV is the virus that can lead to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, or AIDS. Early testing and diagnosis play key roles in reducing the spread of the disease, extending life expectancy, and cutting costs of care. Thanks to better treatments, many people with HIV and AIDS in the U.S. are living longer. Testing is an important first step in getting HIV-infected people the medical care and support they need to improve their health and help them maintain safer behaviors. To learn more about how you can reduce your risk of HIV, check out the CDC’s HIV Risk Reduction Tool.

Visit CDC.gov to learn more about their Act Against AIDS campaign. To find an HIV test site, visit Gettested.cdc.gov, or text your zip code to “KNOWIT” (566948).

December 1st is World AIDS Day, so wear your red ribbon and together we can raise awareness and fight HIV.

Medicare Open Enrollment: time’s running out

Medicare Open Enrollment ends next week on December 7. If you’ve been thinking about changing your Medicare coverage, now is the time to act. You may already know you have choices in how you get Medicare hospital, medical, and prescription drug coverage, but did you know you can get help online? By answering just a few questions about your health care needs, you can see what Medicare choices might be best for you. Then use the Medicare Plan Finder to see the plan options in your area and decide the best mix of benefits and costs that meet your needs and budget.

In these last few days of Medicare Open Enrollment, take a minute to review your options. If you like your current health care coverage and it’s still available for 2018, you don’t need to do anything. But if you’re thinking about making any changes, now’s the time to act.

Make life easier: set up automatic premium payments

Most Medicare Prescription Drug Plans charge a monthly fee that varies by plan. This fee is called a premium. You pay this in addition to the Medicare Part B premium. Did you know that you can have this premium automatically deducted from your monthly Social Security payment? Get peace of mind knowing that bills are paid on time each month.

All you need to do is contact your Medicare Part D drug plan (not Social Security). Your first deduction will usually take 3 months to start, and 3 months of premiums will likely be deducted at once so make sure you have enough in your Social Security payment to cover this. After that, only one premium will be deducted each month. You may also see a delay in premiums being withheld if you switch plans. If you want to stop premium deductions and get billed directly, just let your Medicare drug plan know.

Take the worry and guesswork out of when to pay your premium bills, and contact your drug plan today. Rest assured knowing that your payments will be deducted as scheduled—on time, every time.

It’s always time to quit tobacco

Smoking tobacco can cause many health problems, including heart disease, respiratory diseases, and lung cancer —the leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. Close to 40 million people in the U.S. still smoke tobacco, but quitting can help prevent these health problems. You can quit smoking today, and Medicare wants to help.

Besides being famous for Thanksgiving, November is also Lung Cancer Awareness Month and the Great American Smokeout. While you’re making lists for the upcoming holiday season, make a note to talk with your doctor about quitting if you smoke. Medicare covers 8 face-to-face smoking cessation counseling sessions during a 12-month period. If you haven’t been diagnosed with an illness caused or complicated by tobacco use, you pay nothing for these counseling sessions, as long as you get them from a qualified doctor or another Medicare provider.

Every year, more people die from lung cancer than any other type of cancer and smoking is the leading cause. Don’t become a statistic. Watch our video to learn more about Medicare’s benefits to help you quit.